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STATISTICS Yello Dyno Blog: Cyberbullying
Bullying / Cyberbullying
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Bullying can have far-reaching negative effects on children of all ages, including inciting violent acts, and now it has a new platform: the Internet and cell phones. More information on this topic is available in Yello Dyno's Just the Facts section Bullying & Cyberbullying.

"About one third (32%) of all teenagers who use the Internet say they have been targets of a range of annoying and potentially menacing online activities... Depending on the circumstances, these harassing or "cyberbullying" behaviors may be truly threatening...several patterns are clear: girls are more likely than boys to be targets; and teens who share their identities and thoughts online are more likely to be targets than are those who lead less active online lives. Read the complete Data Memo by the PEW Internet & American Life Project, 2007.

• Fifty percent of kids are bullied and l0% are victims on a regular basis.
- A Month of Mental Health Facts:  Prepared by the staff of the Child Study Center
© 2006 Child Study Center, NYU School of Medicine

"People who show anger rather than sadness are boosting their status within a group, according to four studies by Larissa Tiedens at Stanford University. Not only did observers support angry politicians, as opposed to ones expressing sadness, but they also assigned a higher salary to a job candidate who said he was angry. Being angry creates an impression of competence, and that leads to higher status."
- Psychology News, Jan.11, 2001

"Being bullied is not just an unpleasant rite of passage through childhood," said Duane Alexander, M.D., director of the NICHD. "It's a public health problem that merits attention. People who were bullied as children are more likely to suffer from depression and low self esteem, well into adulthood, and the bullies themselves are more likely to engage in criminal behavior later in life."
- National Institue of Child Health & Human Development, April 24, 2001

According to the latest poll, thirty-two percent of parents fear for their child’s physical safety when the child is at school. Thirty-nine percent of parents with a child in grade six or higher are more likely to say they fear for their child’s safety. Twenty-two percent of parents whose children are in grade five or lower fear for their child’s safety. (Parents Not Overly Concerned About School Environments for Their Children, Gallup News Service, 2001)

Though recent studies show that as many as seventy-five percent of children have been victims of bullying during their school careers, about half of parents in this survey see bullying as no problem for their children.
(Are We Safe?: The 2000 National Crime Prevention Survey, National Crime Prevention Council, 2001)

• Seventy-four percent of 8 - to 11-year-old students said teasing and bullying occur at their schools. (Talking With Kids About Tough Issues: A National Survey of Parents and Kids, Kaiser Family Foundation and Nickelodeon, 2001)

• The prevalence of one problem behavior at school has increased. In 2001, 8 percent of students reported that they had been bullied at school in the last 6 months, up from 5 percent in 1999. (Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2003, Dept. of Criminal Justice, 2003)

• In 1999–2000, public school principals were asked to report how often certain disciplinary problems occurred at their schools. Twenty-nine percent of public schools reported that student bullying occurred on a daily or weekly basis. (Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2003, Dept. of Criminal Justice, 2003)

• 86% said, "other kids picking on them, making fun of them or bullying them" causes teenagers to turn to lethal violence in the schools. (Bureau of Justice, 2001)

• Bullying generally begins in the elementary grades, peaks in the sixth through eight grades, and persists into high school. (Addressing the Problem of Juvenile Bullying, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2001)

• Bullying occurred most frequently in sixth through eighth grade, with little variation between urban, suburban, town, and rural areas; suburban youth were 2-3 percent less likely to bully others. Males were both more likely to bully others and more likely to be victims of bullying than were females. In addition, males were more likely to say they had been bullied physically (being hit, slapped, or pushed), while females more frequently said they were bullied verbally and psychologically (through sexual comments or rumors). of bullying than were females. In addition, males were more likely to say they had been bullied physically (being hit, slapped, or pushed), while females more frequently said they were bullied verbally and psychologically (through sexual comments or rumors). National Institutes of Health, April 24, 2001

• Of a representative sample of youth, almost thirty percent reported some type of involvement in moderate or frequent bullying, as a bully, a target of bullying, or both. (Bullying Behaviors Among US Youth, Journal of the American Medical Association, 2001)

• Overall, almost eleven percent of a representative sample of youth reported bullying others sometimes, and almost nine percent admitted to bullying others once a week or more. Experiencing bullying was reported with similar frequency, with almost nine percent bullied sometimes and just over eight percent bullied once a week or more. (Bullying Behaviors Among US Youth, Journal of the American Medical Association, 2001)

 

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