Yello Dyno - Protecting Children from Child Predators
  Raising Safe Kids Parent Community Workshop Webinar
Your Name
Your Email

We value your privacy!

Latest Memo
Memo Archives

I always read your Yello Dyno Memo tip to toe. There is no better e-zine out there for child safety. Yello Dyno covers the right topics in the right manner (thank-you for not dumbing down this e-zine) and is not afraid to tackle harder issues like violence in the media and in the games we allow our children to play. Your stuff is tough, factual, and fun - and we love it.
- Hjordes Norman,
educator & parent


Jan Wagner Bio

Public Speaking and Training

Around Jan's Kitchen Table

Monthly Memos Index

It's simple, if it jiggles, it's fat.
Arnold Schwarzenegger



 

Founder jan Wagner and Why Yello Dyno Protects Children From Child Predators
Nine-year-old boy uses Yello Dyno
training to escape abductor.


 

Fat is an answer to a problem rather than a problem itself.

The Correlation between Overweight and Obese Children and Victimization

1. The Effects of Child Victimization
2. Fat is an answer to a problem rather than a problem itself.
3. The code for fat in America is CHECKING OUT.
4. Victimization leads to low self–esteem then they CHECK OUT by becoming overweight.
5. Yello Dyno = Emotional Wellness

 

 

Children with low self-esteem, who do not feel worthy of love, sabotage themselves to self-fulfill this deep-rooted belief. There are many forms of self-abuse or ways of sabotaging oneself but one form that is plaguing our society is obesity. To correct the social plague of overweight children Yello Dyno is a key component.

 

 

 

Photo source:
http://amhersttimes.wnymedia.net/2008/06/

The code for fat in America is CHECKING OUT
-
The Culture Code (pages 53-72) By Dr. Clotaire Rapaille (The internationally revered cultural anthropologist and marketing expert.)

 

Yello Dyno helps create emotional wellness by preventing, correcting, resolving and reprogramming destructive experiences of victimization. It is then that children experience being worthy of being safe and worthy of being loved.

1. The Effects of Child Victimization:
A child who experiences victimization in most cases carries a low self-esteem and a negative self-image for the rest of their life.

“Every second a child is a victim of neglect or abuse.”
“Every six seconds a child is a victim of sexual abuse.”

- Injury Prevention and Public Health: Practical Knowledge, Skills, and Strategies, Second Edition, page 112 - Tom Christoffel and Susan Scavo Gallagher.
* More Info at the end

“An incident of child abuse is reported, on average, every l0 seconds. More than 2.9 million reports were made in 2003; the actual incidence is presumed to be much higher.”

- A Month of Mental Health Facts:  Prepared by the staff of the Child Study Center
© 2006 Child Study Center, NYU School of Medicine

“1-3 Girls and 1-7 Boys under the age of 18 are sexually abused.”

-1989 Report presented for Fed. Parliament (RCMP) Jaclyn Mace @ Statistics Canada

The U.S. Administration of Children and Families defines child maltreatment as:
“An act or failure to act by a parent, caretaker, or other person as defined under State law which results in physical abuse, neglect, medical neglect, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, or an act or failure to act which presents an imminent risk of serious harm to a child.”

In the media some of those who harm children are described as sexual predators, Internet stalkers, abusive family members and caregivers, drug pushers, and bullies.

As a culture our children are experiencing an assault not only in their daily lives but also through the media. Constant stories of terrorism, violence, and harm to children fill the airwaves reinforcing to those who experience victimization that the world is a unsafe place and for those who are safe at home that the world at large is not safe.

“In children exposed to violence in the home, these media images of power and violence are major sources of ‘cultural’ values, reinforcing what they have seen modeled at home. And the beliefs and actions of all children reflect the world they are raised in.”

– Violence and Childhood Trauma: Understanding and Responding to the Effects of Violence on Young Children” – Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D.

Because the damage inflicted by “Tricky People”, Yello Dyno’s handle for people who mean them harm, children do not feel safe or worthy of being loved.

As a result millions of children are sitting in our classrooms unable to learn.
A child who does not feel safe cannot learn.

“When considering the learning experiences of the traumatized child – sitting in a classroom in a persisting state of arousal and anxiety – or dissociated…the child is essentially unavailable to process efficiently the complex cognitive information being conveyed by the teacher.”

- Memories of Fear, Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph. D., CIVITAS Child Trauma Programs, Baylor College of Medicine

2. Fat is an answer to a problem rather than a problem itself.
There are many forms of self-abuse or ways of sabotaging oneself but one form that is plaguing our society is obesity. A child who does not feel worthy of love sabotages him/herself to fulfill this deep-rooted belief.

“In 2002, data showed that 15% of children and teens are considered overweight, a tripling since 1980. An additional 15% of kids and teens are considered ‘at risk’ for becoming overweight.
This epidemic increase in childhood overweight is particularly prevalent among African American and Hispanic children, with more than 21% of these groups meeting the classification of overweight. It is estimated that about half of overweight school-agers and 70% of overweight teens will remain obese into adulthood.”

- From How to Teach Nutrition to Kids by Connie Liakos Evers, MS, RD:

“Fat is a significant issue in this country. More than 125 million Americans are overweight. More than 60 million Americans are obese. Nearly 10 million Americans have been clinically diagnosed as morbidly obese… Psychologists have been aware for a long time that fat is an answer to a problem rather than a problem itself. Overeating is a common coping mechanism for the sexually abused… If 50 percent of this country is overweight, there must be a cultural reason for it. What are we coping with?

The tension is always there. We might use alibis, like “big bones” or a slow metabolism. We might talk about “ love handles” or how true beauty resides “on the inside.” Quite often, though, those of us who struggle with our weight are also struggling with one of our connections – to love ones, to the roles we play, to the “rat race.”

– The Culture Code (pages 53-72) By Dr. Clotaire Rapaille (The internationally revered cultural anthropologist and marketing expert.)

3. The code for fat in America is CHECKING OUT.

“Al Gore never served as president of the United States, but he serves as a visual presentation of the Code. When Gore lost the 2000 presidential election, he was understandably distraught and he dropped out of sight for a few months. When he finally agreed to give an interview, we saw him sporting a beard and a considerable amount of extra weight. The loss was so devastating to him that he checked out. Interestingly, when he recently held a press conference to announce the launch of his new cable television network, he looked trim and fit. Al Gore had a new purpose; he’d checked back in…

As Americans, we are masters at putting undue pressure upon our selves… In fact, for many of us, it’s much too much. Therefore, we unconsciously check out. Better to blame the fat than to acknowledge our desire to eschew expectations.

Getting fat is the most common available unconscious way to check out of the rat race, to adopt a strong identity (as an overweight person) without having to fight for it, to move from active to passive. Being fat allows us to know who we are (fat), why this has happened (the overabundance of food “ forced” on us), who is responsible (McDonald’s or some other fast food restaurant that “makes us” eat their food), and what our identity is (a victim). Fat also allows us to use commonly accepted alibis to regress to childhood. Another tension we experience is that as babies and young children, we are fed with the intention of making us fat – no one wants a skinny baby- but as we get older, society pressures is to be thin no one wants a skinny baby – but as we get older, society pressures us to be thin. If we get fat enough, we unconsciously think, perhaps others will take care of us again, as they did when we were babies."

– The Culture Code (pages 53-72) By Dr. Clotaire Rapaille (The internationally revered cultural anthropologist and marketing expert.)

“One of the most powerful examples of the connections between a motor ‘memory’ and an ‘emotional’ and ‘state’ memory relate to oropharageal motor activity – eating. For individuals fortunate enough to have an attentive, nurturing caregiver, eating as an infant (the time when the patterns of oropharangeal motor patterns related to eating are being built into the brain) becomes associated with eye contact, social intimacy, safety, calm, touch, cooing (e.g. Hatfield and Rapson, 1993). This wonderful, soothing and interactive somatosensory bath that the nurturing caregiver provides literally organizes and ‘grows’ the brain areas associated with attachment and emotional regulation (see Perry et al., 1995; Perry, 1997). Disruptions of this ‘bath’ by neglect, depression, trauma, or chaotic, inconsistent experiences can result in abnormal eating and relationship formation.”

-Memories of Fear, Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph. D., CIVITAS Child Trauma Programs, Baylor College of Medicine

We know through statistics that over one-third of Americans have experienced abuse. This knowledge gives us a key to the healing process for those who are overweight. Being overweight has at the core a self-destructive, self-fulfilling prophecy. I am not worth keeping safe. I am not worthy of love. Abuse has left millions of children functioning in a fight or flight response all the time. This creates a constant state of anxiety that is either biologically responded to by not eating or is deadened by over eating.

4. Victimization leads to low self–esteem then they CHECK OUT by becoming overweight.

Being overweight is one of the outward signs of a child who feels like a victim. The Yello Dyno Program helps heal these children. Yello Dyno prevents, corrects, resolves and reprograms destructive experiences of victimization. Yello Dyno helps children experience being worth keeping safe and being worthy of love. The Yello Dyno character embodies the qualities of a protective, caring and loving adult. The Yello Dyno Band is a club that they can become a member of “check-in’ giving them a sense of connection.

The Yello Dyno Method™ addresses core needs in children. The Yello Dyno Program is research based.

The Yello Dyno Method™ ensures your children automatically recall right action and act on it in a crisis. Scientifically based on the Nobel Prize-winning research of Dr. Roger Sperry concerning the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres and the internationally recognized research on children in crisis of Dr. Bruce Perry.

"If a child has information stored in cortical areas but in the specific moment is very fearful, this information is inaccessible. In this regard, cognitively-stored information does little good in the life threatening moment."

"Information learned in song, rhyme or rap is more easily recalled when in a state of high arousal (anxiety). This is due, of course, to the fact that this information is stored in a different fashion than traditional verbal cognitive information."

- Bruce D. Perry, Ph.D.,Civitas Violence and Childhood Trauma: Understanding and responding to the Effects of Violence on Young Children

Knowledge is power. Knowledge removes fear. Music is the best way to learn and REMEMBER safety rules. But safety knowledge cannot be taught the same way you teach English or math. The knowledge has to be stored in the part of the brain that takes charge when a child is fearful or anxious. That is why Yello Dyno teaches safety lessons through music. Music ensures automatic recall of right action in a crisis. Children remember what to do to stay safe and they do it.

Independent research states:
"80.8% of the students tested demonstrated an increase in knowledge after one cycle of the Yello Dyno curriculum."

- Independent research conducted by REdS, Research and Educational Services Evaluation Specialists, 2004-2005

5. Yello Dyno = Emotional Wellness for Children

Therefore, to create emotional wellness and correct the social plague of overweight children make Yello Dyno a component of your educational program.

 

Yours for child safety,

Jan Wagner
Yello Dyno Founder

P.S.
Why The Yello Dyno Curricula Fits The Times:

The “No Child Left Behind” Bill has dramatically limited class time.

Yello Dyno offers a method of education that is research-based, highly effective requiring little time in the class day. Yello Dyno is cost effective, easy to implement, takes little preparation time for the teacher. The core lessons of personal safety and self -esteem are taught and the lessons learned last a lifetime.

Source for the first statistic:
How stat was derived:

“Every second a child is a victim of neglect or abuse.”
There are 525,000 minutes per year divided by 900,000 = .583333 seconds.

“Every 5.83 seconds a child is a victim of sexual abuse.”
There are 525,000 minutes per year divided by 90,000 = 5.83 seconds.

Stat: In 2002, close to 900,000 children were victims of child abuse or neglect, a rate of 12.3 children per 1000 children in the national population. Of these 900,000 maltreated children, roughly 60% were neglected, 20% physically abused, 10% sexually abused, and 7% emotionally mistreated.

-Injury Prevention and Public Health: Practical Knowledge, Skills, and Strategies, Second Edition, page 112 - Tom Christoffel and Susan Scavo Gallagher.



Contact Us: Need more information? Call Barbara toll free 888-935-5639, extension 104,
or contact us by e-mail. We look forward to helping you select the training, curricula, materials and programs that will meet your safety needs
.

P.S.S. Educators, Non-profits, Churches and Law Enforcement: to have a Yello Dyno Curriculum sent to you for a thirty-day review, fill out this online form, or call Barbara at 888-935-5639 ext. 104 or email her at Barbara@YelloDyno.com

Comments? Ideas for future memos? Contact me: Jan@YelloDyno.com.

Never miss an email from
YelloDyno.com! To ensure that YelloDyno.com communications are not filtered into your 'junk/bulk' folder, select the 'Add/Save to Address Book' function in your email browser and follow the appropriate instructions.

We value your privacy. You are in control and can discontinue receipt of this email.


 

Copyright 1994-2008 Yello Dyno, Inc. • "Yello Dyno" and the Yello Dyno character are federally registered trademarks of Yello Dyno, Inc.